Walney to Wear Sustrans cycle route map

Walney to Wear Sustrans Map

Walney to Wear Sustrans cycle route map

Walney to Wear Sustrans cycle route map

This would be the official Walney to Wear Sustrans cycle route map to the 151 mile cycle ride between Barrow-in-Furness and Sunderland. However, it is out of print!

A best option now would be to use the Sustrans pocket-sized maps. You would need South Cumbria; County Durham; then depending on your finish point, either Tyne & Wear or North York Moors.

This is the general route:

Walney to Wear route map
Walney – Wear cycle route

 

You can read an article about the route on the website of The Westmorland Gazette here: “A series of country lanes and quiet roads have been linked by sections of cycle paths, forest trails and off-road tracks to form an integrated, sign-posted route across the country. The W2W has been developed by Sustrans, a national charity whose aim is to encourage people to walk, cycle and use public transport. The same body opened the now world-famous C2C cycle route from Whitehaven to Sunderland in 1993, which is used by around 15,000 cyclists every year.”

Walney to Wear Cycle Route

Walney to Wear Cycle Route

Walney to Wear Cycle Route Map
The Walney to Wear cycle route

This is probably the least cycled of the coast to coast cycle routes linking the Cumbrian coast and the North East, but an extremely good route. 153 miles of coast and hills, and joining the far end of the C2C.

The route starts near Barrow-in-Furness in south Cumbria and skirts the Lake District. It snakes through the Pennines to finish at Sunderland.

Walney to Wear Cycle Route Map

The map is unfortunately currently out of print. Once it is back in print, we will put it back on the website.

In the meantime, there are the pocket-sized Sustrans maps which can be used to follow it. You would need South CumbriaCounty Durham; then depending on your finish point, either Tyne & Wear or North York Moors.

I have cycled part of the route, and it is highly recommended. Suggest you get maps though!

Click here to go the shop.

Or pop the various maps in your basket below.

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Cycling in the Lake District and Cumbria

Cycling past Buttermere

Cycling in the Lake District and Cumbria

Walking, running and cycling in the Lake District and Cumbria. What could be better?

The English Lake District is perfect for outdoors folk, and – while better known for the hill-walking and running – is ever more a destination for cyclists. Of course, there are hills in the Lake District. Some quite big ones really.

So if you are a cyclist who likes a challenge, that’s great! Plenty to offer.

If you prefer flatter routes, those exist as well, particularly in parts of Cumbria just outside the Lake District itself. You just need to know where they are!

There are a number of cycle maps and guide books to help, and I have some suggestions of different types of routes below, along with the map or guide book that would help you plan your route and find your way.

Where to cycle in the Lake District and Cumbria? The maps and guide books available.

Below you will find sections on different aspects of cycling in the Lake District and Cumbria:

  • Suggested cycle touring and cycling holiday hubs
  • Gentle / family bike rides
  • Cycle touring
  • Waymarked long-distance cycle routes
  • Mountain biking / off-road cycle routes
  • Cycle-friendly holiday accommodation
  • Cycling maps and guide books

Suggested cycle touring and cycling holiday hubs in the Lake District and Cumbria

If you are bringing bikes by car, there are all sorts of places in Cumbria and the Lake District that welcome bikes. See below for some suggestions.

I’ve also chosen three possible hubs:

  • Keswick, for some challenging and adventurous touring, access to the coast and to the C2C cycle route, and close to Whinlatter Forest for mountain bike trails
  • Ambleside, as above, but also with Grizedale Forest and its range of ability trails and the Langdale valleys not far away
  • Grange-over-Sands, with access to flatter cycle routes suitable for families, and reachable by rail
Keswick, one of the cycle touring hubs in the Lake District
Keswick, a great base for a cycle touring holiday in the Lake District

Gentle / family bike rides in the Lake District and Cumbria

When you open a map of the Lake District itself, one thing you tend to notice is the lack of flat land and therefore flat roads suitable for gentle or family cycle rides. You tend to have to look around the outside of the Lake District National Park for cycle rides for young families.

Grange-over-Sands to Town End

Grange-over-Sands
Grange-over-Sands

Just outside the Lake District National Park, Grange-over-Sands is a really nice little town sitting on the Morecambe Bay estuary. From Grange-over-Sands a five-mile cycle along the quietest of country lanes brings you to the village of Town End (which has a pub for refreshments).

This is a gorgeous ride, thoroughly recommended.

Start off on quite a busy road (so take great care) but very shortly turn right on to the quiet lanes. Then just follow the Sustrans signs until you get to Town End.

Map: This is part of The Bay Cycle Way route, so the Sustrans Bay Cycle Way map is ideal.

Maryport to Allonby cycle route

This is an almost entirely traffic-free and flat cycle route hugging the shoreline on Cumbria’s west coast for about 6 miles.

Starting from the car park outside Maryport’s Lake District Coast Aquarium (which also has a café and toilets), cross over the bridge back towards town and immediately turn left. For the first couple of hundred yards you will be on a road, but then the road stops and instead you can ride traffic-free on the old promenade for half a mile.

Then cycle out through Maryport Golf Club and crossing a road (so take care of little ones here) and you are on to the cycleway. For about three miles you are on the east side of the road, before the cycleway crosses the road again (take care…) and is right next to the sea for the last 2-3 miles into the village of Allonby. The village has a café, shop and play area.

Map: This is part of Hadrian’s Cycleway (from Ravenglass to South Shields, so the Sustrans Hadrian’s Cycleway map is ideal, also giving other family friendly route ideas.

Grizedale Forest

The Forestry Commission’s Grizedale Forest lies between the shores of Windermere on the east and the village of Hawkshead on the west.

There are several waymarked cycle trails on forest roads, some short and quite flat, others longer and more of a challenge.

Of course, there are also real mountain-bike trails as well, so potentially something for all the family.

Have a look at their website to see if it is for you:
https://www.forestryengland.uk/grizedale/cycling-and-mountain-biking-trails-grizedale

The Solway coast

Cumbria’s northern peninsula is some distance from the Lake District National Park, and the scenery is very different to the mountains of the Lakes. It is flat! This is a 14-mile ride, and for much of the time you will be looking across the Solway Firth estuary to Scotland.

Park a car at Anthorn, a small village next to the river and cycle west along quiet country lanes.

The route follows the shoreline for about ten miles, stopping at the Solway Wetlands Centre near Bowness-on-Solway for a well-deserved cup of something (and maybe a tour of the RSPB site).

Then turn right at Glasson to cut across the peninsula for another four miles to bring you to the village of Whitrigg, where you turn right again to cycle back to Anthorn.

The coastal sections of the route are part of Hadrian’s Cycleway, so the Sustrans Hadrian’s Cycleway map is perfect.

Keswick on the old railway track

This would have been the first family-friendly cycle route to mention, but unfortunately the bridges crossing the river were washed away in 2015 and have yet to be restored. So there is just a short section open now, about a mile long.

This is (was) part of the C2C route, so Sustrans and the council are in discussion about how to replace the bridges so that you can cycle traffic-free to the village of Threlkeld, but they have not been replaced as yet.

It still makes a nice (but short ride), including an incline out of Keswick, then a descent under the main road before coming to a halt at what would have been the first river crossing.

Map: you probably don’t need one. Park at the swimming pool and cycle out along the cycle path next to what was Keswick Railway Station. Cycle as far as you can go. Stop and look at the incredible damage that the flood water did to the bridge and the river banks. Maybe have drink and a picnic next to the river. And then cycle back again.

Cycle touring in the Lake District

There are two very good guide books for cycle touring in the Lake District and Cumbria, or you can use the cycling maps from Sustrans or the Ordnance Survey Tour Map to create your own cycle routes. You might also choose to read ‘A Lake District Grand Tour’ of which more below.

Lake District cycling

Suggested routes from Keswick

Circuit of the Skiddaw and Blencathra ranges

33/34 miles and ‘strenuous’. Fantastic views and mostly quiet lanes until the last section back into Keswick.

Park in Keswick (or hire a bike there), heading out on the C2C cycle route to Threlkeld. Follow signs to Mungrisdale then Caldbeck (excellent pub here with its own brewery). Then follow signs to Bassenthwaite, before following the main road (though not too busy) back to Keswick.

Both the CycleCity and Cicerone guide books give good descriptions and maps. See below. Or use the Sustrans or OS Tour map.

Other suggested cycle routes from Keswick:

Crummock Water

See the Sustrans South Cumbria and the Lake District map to follow these routes.

  • Over Whinlatter Pass to Lorton, past Crummock Water and Buttermere, back via Honister Pass and Derwentwater. Very challenging.
  • Cycling to Ambleside via Castlerigg Stone Circle, Thirlmere, Grasmere and Red Bank
  • The circuit of Derwentwater. Take care on busy days down the east side of the lake.
  • Over Whinlatter Pass to Lorton, Cockermouth and the reverse of the Workington branch of the C2C

Suggested cycle routes from Ambleside

Ambleside, Ullswater, Thirlmere and Grasmere circuit

41 hard miles according to the Cicerone guide book (below), but well worth it if the legs and lungs will stand it.

The route starts in Ambleside heading very steeply up The Struggle and over the rock-strewn Kirkstone Pass. Then drops beautifully down to Ullswater, following the lakeshore before climbing up again northwards.

Quiet lanes then take you to Threlkeld (choice of pubs available) and then drop you down on to the St Johns in the Vale road (B5322). Cross over the main Keswick-Ambleside road to ride round the very quiet western side of Thirlmere. Then join the new cycle track that avoids climbing Dunmail Raise on the main road. From there you can either fly down towards Grasmere on the main road, or cut off on small lanes.

Don’t use the main road from Grasmere to Ambleside (which is very busy and unpleasant) if you still have the legs for a climb up the challenging Red Bank to bring you back to Ambleside on the Hawkshead road.

Other cycle routes from Ambleside

Cycling in Langdale
Cycling in Langdale

These probably best followed using the Sustrans South Cumbria and the Lake District map:

  • Head west out of Ambleside in the Little Langdale. Up and over to Great Langdale. Return via Elterwater and Skelwith Bridge.
  • Again head west from Ambleside, turning south for Coniston. Cycle down the east side of Lake Coniston, then turn back north to follow the lanes through Grizedale Forest (including a stop at the café) and into Hawkshead. Back from there in many places off-road.

Suggested cycle routes from Grange-over-Sands

Circuit of Whitbarrow

This is a 29-mile fairly tough route from Cicerone’s guide book Cycling in the Lake District (see below).

Heading east out of Grange-over-Sands towards the village of Town End the going is straightforward and quite level, at least as far as Levens.

Pedalling north from there in a big loop brings you back to Town End in a figure-of-eight. But then you head for delightful Cartmel. Don’t forget to stop for some refreshment here. The sticky toffee pudding is legendary!

After that, it’s really not that far back to Grange – just enough to shake your pudding down.

Guide book: Cicerone’s Cycling in the Lake District

Other cycle routes from Grange-over-Sands

  • The Bay Cycleway to Dalton-in-Furness (and the train back?)
  • The Bay Cycleway to Carnforth (and the train back?)
  • Circuit of Coniston Water via Grizedale Forest
  • Broughton-in-Furness to Eskdale, over the Hardknott Pass and back via Coniston – a challenge this one

Guide books for cycle touring in the Lake District and Cumbria

Cicerone’s Cycling in the Lake District

The guide book begins with a tour of the Lake District over several days. It’s challenging, of course, but then this is the Lake District! The book then has day rides, again many of which are quite challenging, though some less so. Rides include:

  • Ambleside to Eskdale and back the long way round
  • Penrith to Haweswater
  • A circuit of Skiddaw from Keswick via Caldbeck

Cycle Tours in and around the Lake District‘ from CycleCity in association with Ordnance Survey

Using excellent Ordnance Survey mapping, the guide book has 20 cycle tour descriptions, the length varying from 24 to 35 miles. Each graded from Easy to Strenuous. Rides include:

  • Keswick and Newlands – 26 miles, strenuous
  • Ring around Kendal – 33 miles, moderate
  • Grasmere and Coniston – 25 miles, strenuous

Planning your own circular rides in the Lake District and Cumbria

You have the choice of either Ordnance Survey or Sustrans cycle maps to plan and ride your own tours of the Lake District and Cumbria.

  • Sustrans South Cumbria and the Lake District pocket cycle map
  • Sustrans North Cumbria and Dumfries pocket cycle map
  • Ordnance Survey Tour Map of the Lake District and Cumbria

Waymarked long-distance cycle routes in Cumbria and the Lake District

The C2C coast to coast cycle route

For full information on the route, see the C2C page here.

Hadrian’s Cycleway

Normally an east to west cycle route, Hadrian’s Cycleway follows a route within Cumbria from Carlisle down the west to coast to Ravenglass.

The Reivers Route

Originally intended as a reverse C2C route, the Reivers Route is a very good ride in its own right.

Within Cumbria, the Reivers Route map brings you south from Carlisle to Caldbeck, skirting the northern fells to Cockermouth. From there it reaches the coast at Workington, then follows down the coast on mostly off-road routes to the start point of the C2C in Whitehaven.

Walney to Wear

Walney to Wear is an excellent long-distance waymarked ride (one of my top five in fact), but unfortunately the map is out of print. It can be followed using Sustrans maps. For more information on which, go to the Walney to Wear page.

The route runs within Cumbria from Walney Island near Barrow-in-Furness around the southern coastline of Cumbria to Kendal, then across the quieter reaches of eastern Cumbria before setting off through the Pennines.

The Bay Cycleway

Cartmel
Cartmel, on the Bay Cycle Way route

This a newer cycle route, again starting near Barrow, but doing a loop around Morecambe Bay, ending in Morecambe / Lancaster.

It is a great route, much of it quite flat – but not all if it, so do take a look at where the contours are on the Bay Cycle Way map before you start!

And take time out to visit Cartmel.

Tour of the Lake District

A Lake District Grand Tour
A Lake District Grand Tour

There are several ways to do a grand tour of the Lake District. You can use the excellent Cicerone Cycling in the Lake District guide book.

Or you can use the Sustrans and OS Tour maps to make your own route, just as I did to write “A Lake District Grand Tour“, which is not a guide book at all.

It’s more a humorous tale of taking on a challenge to cycle over all of the passes, to see all of the lakes, and to go to the furthest north, south, east and west points of the Lake District National Park.

This is one hell of way to see the Lake District National Park! A great description of the grandest of Lake District tours. Get pedalling!’ wrote the Chief Exec of the National Park (no less).

Mountain biking / off-road cycle routes in the Lake District

There are both wild and structured mountain bike routes in the area.

For structured routes, go to Whinlatter Forest, west of Keswick, and Grizedale Forest south of Hawkshead, both with excellent mountain bike routes in Forestry Commission woodland.

There are two main options for maps and guide books for more wild mountain biking.

Goldeneye’s Lake District Mountain Bike Routes has ten routes printed on a very robust waterproof map, and shown very distinctly and clearly.

Five of the routes are centred on Keswick, the others spread around the area. They are extremely good routes, worked out by the experienced Al Churcher.

Routes include The Skiddaw Round and Around Blencathra, the Watendlath and Honister Circuit, and Eskdale.

The other option is Lake District Mountain Biking – Essential Trails, published by Vertebrate Publishing.

In the form of a book rather than a map, it details 27 routes, splitting them into Classics, Epics, Enduros and Killers!

Routes include High Street, Borrowdale and Skiddaw.

Cycle-friendly Holiday Accommodation in the Lake District and Cumbria

There is a lot of holiday accommodation in the Lake District and Cumbria of course, but the following are particularly happy to welcome cyclists.

This section is still to be completed.

The maps and guide books for cycling in Cumbria and the Lake District

Previews of some of the maps and guide books below:

All available from the Bike Ride Maps webshop:

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The Top 5 Sustrans Cycle Routes

Top 5 Sustrans Cycle Routes, by Mike Carden
A blog post from Mike Carden

I’ve cycled a lot of Britain’s Sustrans cycle routes over the years, studied their maps, got lost, and occasionally found, and enjoyed them hugely. But which, I thought, were the best? Which would be my Top 5 Sustrans cycle routes?

Counting down, this is my choice of the Top 5 Sustrans Cycle Routes in Britain’s National Cycle Network.

5. The C2C Coast to Coast cycle route

ONLY Number 5?! When around a quarter of a million people have cycled the route? Each dipping their wheels in the Irish Sea, cycling from one side of the country to the other then dipping their wheels in the North Sea? Passing through the Lake District, the Pennines and County Durham? Yes. Truly. If you have cycled the C2C already, pick another from this list, cycle it, then decide!

So what’s wrong with the C2C, or the ‘Sea to Sea’ as the Sustrans map calls it? What makes it only Number 5? Well, not much is ‘wrong’ with it. The route is a good one. Over the usual three days, the first day through the Lake District is a fine one, even if the long stretch towards Penrith does mean you’ll be pleased to see your overnight stop come into view. The second day through the Pennines is a tough day, but this is meant to be a challenge! And the third day, maybe another steep hill or two in the Pennines, but then downhill all the way to the coast.

The C2C Cycle RouteIt’s not uncommon to treat the route as a challenge, for the hyper-fit to cycle it in a single day, but then you would almost certainly have to ride only the road version of the C2C. You would miss out on some of the best sections, off-road through the Pennines and into County Durham.

Perhaps it would be better to take it slower? Why not take five days or even a week at a slower pace, stopping off in Keswick to visit Derwentwater (or cycle around it?), rather than ploughing on out of sight it? Perhaps dropping down to Ullswater before cycling along to Pooley Bridge and from there to Penrith to rejoin the C2C route. And once over the Pennines, take a day at Beamish Open Air Museum, before finishing at Tynemouth or Sunderland.

The 136-mile long C2C is mostly well sign-posted, the Sustrans C2C map and the various guide books detailed and clear. And accommodation is set up for cyclists along the way (if you book early for popular days).

But maybe that’s the point. After all, a quarter of a million other people have already cycled it. It’s good, yes. But where might you get a different challenge? One where people don’t say, “Oh yes, I cycled the C2C ten years ago”, but instead say, “Hey, I’ve never done that route. What’s it like?”

4. The Walney to Wear Cycle Route

The Walney to Wear Cycle RouteThe What? I have to take issue with Sustrans over their choice of name for this route. Who outside southern Cumbria knows that Walney is an island off southern Cumbria near Barrow-in-Furness? And who other than the inhabitants of the North East of England, or those football fans familiar with the ‘Tyne-Wear derby’, could place the River Wear’s mouth in Sunderland? It’s a coast to coast cycle route! So why not call it that? Say, ‘The Other Coast to Coast Cycle Route’? Ah, no, because there are more than just these, such as The Reivers Route and Hadrian’s Cycleway. How about ‘The Wild Coast to Coast Cycle Route’?

Because that’s what it is. Less tamed by thousands of other cyclists over the years. You can still dip your wheels in the sea at both ends, still see the Lake District and the Pennines, still say you’ve cycled from coast to coast on a long weekend.

There’s signposting along the 152-mile route and Sustrans maps. And it still has a W in the name.

I’ve often wondered about how that. Did the marketing folk at Sustrans just happen to notice that two random places began with W and thought they’d make a cycle route between them? I guess Worcester was a bit unlucky to miss out.

Walney to Wear deserves the name ‘The Wild Coast to Coast’. Cycle it and see.

3. The Lochs and Glens Cycle Route, from Glasgow to Inverness

The Lochs and Glens cycle route is sort of a coast to coast. It runs across the Highlands of Scotland, and it’s great: cycling from the centre of Glasgow out towards the Clyde, cutting up to Loch Lomond, and then into the wildest of country heading north.

It’s a shame to call it ‘Lochs and Glens North’ as Sustrans does, because that makes it feel like just a part of a route. ‘Lochs and Glens South’ runs from Carlisle through Dumfries, Galloway and Ayrshire to Glasgow and is not very Lochs and Glens-y. No. Glasgow to Inverness is the real ‘Lochs and Glens’ as far as I am concerned.

The Lochs and Glens Cycle RouteBecause it really is full of lochs and glens. Loch Lomond, Loch Venacher, Loch Earn and Loch Tay even before you reach lovely Pitlochry. Then up through the woods at Killiecrankie, to the castle and distilleries at Blair Atholl. This route is not without its distilleries. Another plus point.

Then you climb into the Cairngorms, mostly on a dedicated cycleway separated from the A7, or on very quiet roads. Up and up to Dawhinnie. Oh, look, another distillery!

Then to the tourist centre of Aviemore and the fabulous bridge at Carrbridge. You even take in Culloden Visitor Centre for a bit of battling (or tea and cakes) before cycling on into Inverness, the capital of the Highlands. 217 miles / 349 Km according the Lochs and Glens North map.

It really is a wonderful cycle route. Highly recommended.

2. The Devon Coast to Coast Cycle Route

Number 2. Close, in my opinion. Very close to the Number 1 spot.

The Devon Coast to Coast Cycle RouteThe route starts on Plymouth Hoe, sharing Sir Francis Drake’s view out to the English Channel. Waymarked roads lead you out of Plymouth on to traffic-free disused railway lines through gorgeous woodland, steadily climbing towards the fringes of Dartmoor.

You will see the fascinating towns of Tavistock, Lydford and Okehampton, and then gently descend to the sea at Bideford. Joing the Tarka Trail round the coast to Barnstaple, and then up and over to drop towards the sea again at Ilfracombe.

There are 100 miles of fabulous riding on the Devon Coast to Coast cycle route, with mostly gentle inclines, very often traffic-free and with an excellent guide book and map available.

I say ‘100 miles’, but you can easily extend it, as I did – up on to Dartmoor itself, staying over in the middle of Dartmoor within sound of the Hound of the Baskervilles. Or dropping down to visit Buckland Abbey, home of Sir Francis Drake. Or looping out to Woolacombe before the finish at Ilfracombe.

Just watch though – when you come off the traffic-free routes on either side, you hit hills. They are worth it, but get some hill-training in first if you are going to enjoy the excursions off the route!

Before my Number 1, here are some National Cycle Network routes the nearly ranked in my Top 5:

  • The Way of the Roses across Yorkshire and Lancashire
  • The Reivers Route, from Tynemouth to Whitehaven via Kielder Water and Carlisle
  • The Celtic Way from Fishguard in West Wales all the way across South Wales and over the Severn to Bristol

Nearly, but not quite.

And so to the Number 1 in my Top 5 Sustrans Cycle Routes in Britain:

1. The Coast and Castles Cycle Route

The Coast and Castles Cycle Route, number 1 in the Top 5 Sustrans Cycle RoutesOfficially this is the ‘Coast and Castles South’ cycle route. Which I take issue with. It used to be the ‘Coast and Castles’ before someone decided that Edinburgh to Aberdeen should be ‘Coast and Castles North’. No. Call that route something else. The 200-mile waymarked cycle route from Tynemouth near Newcastle-upon-Tyne to Edinburgh is the real deal.
Northumberland has great riding along the coast, and you are never very far from castles – Alnwick and Bamburgh the most iconic. There are gorgeous beaches to your right and rolling farm fields to your left.

And then there is Holy Island – Lindisfarne – which is beautiful. Time it right so that you can cycle across the causeway (and back) before the sea floods it at high tide. It’s well worth it.

On to Berwick with its great ramparts, a border town if ever there was one, swapping between Scotland and England over the centuries.

Coast and Castles cycle route in the Scottish BordersThen make a choice, continuing around the lovely coastline or pedal inland to the Scottish Borders towns of Kelso, Melrose and Galashiels. Call off at ruined abbeys and more castles, then climb up through peaceful valleys for an astonishing view over the destination of your ride: the city of Edinburgh.

Cycle lanes and quite back roads take you right into the centre of the great city to the foot of the final castle on your ride, Edinburgh Castle.

It’s about 200 miles to Edinburgh altogether, but take your time and use the Sustrans Coast and Castles map to explore a fabulous part of Britain.

In my Top 5 Sustrans cycle routes, the Coast and Castles is my Number One.

County Durham and North Yorkshire Cycle Map

County Durham and North Yorkshire Cycle Map

County Durham and North Yorkshire Cycle Map
County Durham and North Yorkshire Cycle Map

This area map shows the National Cycle Network and local routes in this area. It covers County Durham & North Yorkshire region in the north east of England, including Middlesbrough, Stockton-On-Tees, Hartlepool, Bishop Auckland, Billingham and Durham.

This pocket-sized colour map shows clearly mapped on-road and traffic-free paths, easy to read contours, and detailed inset maps for the major towns and cities as well as recommended linking routes connecting the NCN with quiet roads. The map also features 5 day rides with directions and a description of the area, highlighting key cycle routes, local history and places of interest.

Major cycle routes covered by this map:

National Route 70 between Kirkby Stephen and Houghton-Le-Spring via Barnard Castle and Durham. This makes up part of the Walney to Wear & Whitby (W2W) long-distance ride.

National Route 165 between Barnard Castle and Great Ayton. This makes up part of the Walney to Whitby (W2W) arm of the long-distance ride.

National Route 7 between Nenthead and Waskerley. This makes up part of the Sea to Sea (C2C) long-distance cycle route.

National Route 1 along the coast between Middlesbrough and Seaham. This route is part of the North Sea Cycle Route.

National Route 14 between Darlington and Lanchester via Stockton-on-Tees, Hartlepool and Durham.

National Route 71 between Tan Hill on the Yorkshire Dales and Northallerton.

National Route 65 between Sutton-under-Whitestonecliffe and Middlesbrough.

Regional Route 10 also known as the Yorkshire Dales Cycelway.

County Durham and North Yorkshire Cycle Map

Author: Sustrans
Page Size: 99 x 155 mm
ISBN 10: 191084506X
ISBN 13: 9781910845066
Publisher: Sustrans
Published Date: December 2015
Edition: 1st ed, Dec 2015
Binding: Sheet map (folded)
Weight: 50g

Tyne and Wear Cycle Map

Tyne and Wear Cycle Map

Tyne and Wear Cycle Map from Sustrans

Tyne and Wear Cycle Map

CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT

This area map shows the National Cycle Network and local routes in this area. It covers the Tyne and Wear and south Northumberland region in the north east of England, including Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Sunderland, Chester-le-street, Consett and Hexham.

This pocket-sized colour map shows clearly mapped on-road and traffic-free paths, easy to read contours, and detailed inset maps for the major towns and cities as well as recommended linking routes connecting the NCN with quiet roads. The map also features 5 day rides with directions and a description of the area, highlighting key cycle routes, local history and places of interest.

Major cycle routes covered by this map:

National Route 7 between Nenthead and Sunderland. This is part of the Sea to Sea (C2C) long-distance ride.

National Route 70 – the final section of the Walney to Wear long-distance cycle route from Walney Island in Cumbria to Sunderland.

National Route 68 between Alston and Alnham via Haltwhistle. This makes up part of the Pennine Cycleway long-distance cycle route.

National Route 72 between Gilsland and Willington. This makes up part of theHadrian’s Cycleway.

National Route 1 between Seaham and Alnmouth. This route is part of the North Sea Cycle Route. The Coast and Castles South long-distance rides starts in Newcastle and follows National Route 1.

National Route 10 between Kielder Water and North Shields. This makes up part of the Reivers Route long-distance ride.

National Route 14 between Durham and South Shields via Consett, Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead.

Tyne and Wear Cycle Map

Author: Sustrans
Page Size: 99 x 155 mm
Publisher: Sustrans
Published Date: December 2015
Edition: 1st ed, Dec 2015
Binding: Sheet map (folded)
Weight: 50g

South Cumbria and The Lake District Sustrans Cycle Map

South Cumbria & The Lake District Cycle Map from Sustrans

South Cumbria and The Lake District Sustrans Cycle Map 31

 

South Cumbria & The Lake District Cycle Map from Sustrans
South Cumbria & The Lake District Cycle Map from Sustrans

This is the South Cumbria and The Lake District Sustrans Cycle Map including Walney to Wear & Whitby (W2W), Hadrian’s Cycleway, the Sea to Sea (C2C), Bay Cycle Way and 5 individual day rides.

This is in the series of pocket sized, folded maps to the National Cycle Network which include clearly mapped on-road and traffic-free paths, easy to read contours and detailed town insets. Published by Sustrans. 1:110,000 scale; folded 155mm x 99mm; flat 792mm x 630mm.

Detailed information:

South Cumbria and the Lake District Cycle Map

This area map shows the National Cycle Network and local routes in this area. It covers South Cumbria and the Lake District National Park in the north west of England, including Workington, Barrow-in-Furness, Kendal, Keswick, Penrith and Appleby-in-Westmorland.

This pocket-sized colour map shows clearly mapped on-road and traffic-free paths, easy to read contours, and detailed inset maps for the major towns and cities as well as recommended linking routes connecting the NCN with quiet roads. The map also features 5 day rides with directions and a description of the area, highlighting key cycle routes, local history and places of interest.

Major cycle routes covered by this map:

National Route 72 between Ravenglass and Allonby via Whitehaven and Workington. This forms the beginning of Hadrian’s Cycleway.

National Route 71 from Workington to Appleby-in-Westmorland via Cockermouth, Keswick and Penrith with an arm from Cleator Moor to Thornthwaite. This makes up the western third of the C2C route.

National Route 7 between Welton and Leadgate via Penrith.

National Route 70 between Barrow-in-Furness and Kirkby Stephen. This forms the principle route of the Walney to Wear and Whitby (W2W) long distance ride.

National Route 68 between south of Sedbergh to Leadgate via Appleby-in-Westmorland. This makes up part of the Pennine Cycleway.

National Route 6 between Yealand Storrs and Ambleside via Kendal and Windermere.

National Route 700 between Barrow-in-Furness and Silverdale. This makes up part of the new Bay Cycle Way.

South Cumbria and The Lake District Sustrans Cycle Map

Page Size: 99 x 155 mm
ISBN 10: 1910845027
ISBN 13: 9781910845028
Publisher: Sustrans
Published Date: April 2015
Edition: 1st ed, May 2015
Binding: Sheet map (folded)
Weight: 50g

Cycle Maps and Cycle Touring Guide Books

BIKE RIDE MAPS
The cycle maps and cycle touring guide books website

If you are looking for where to buy a cycle map or a cycling guide book, or for suggestions and advice on where to ride, you have found the right place.

We specialise in cycle maps and cycle touring guide books, with stock of maps and guides for all of the main long-distance cycle routes (such as the C2C and the Devon Coast to Coast) and for specialist cycle-maps covering all the counties, regions and nations in the UK.

We have cycle maps and cycling guide books covering Cornwall to John o’Groats, Kent to Snowdonia, Tyne & Wear to Northern Ireland. There are also guide books or maps for the many popular cycle routes in Europe – Mallorca, France, the Danube!

Bike Ride Maps webstore - where to buy cycle maps and cycle touring guide books

We also have suggestions of where you might might ride, such as in the Cycling in Devon, Cycling in Sussex and Cycling the Lake District and Cumbria blog posts, with more to follow.

Read on for more information on what you can find on the website and for links to the webstore.

Long-distance cycle-touring routes

We have maps for all the long-distance waymarked cycle routes in the UK. Most of them are Sustrans National Cycle Network routes, such as the C2C, though some are run separately, such as the Scottish C2C.

You can read more about the most popular of them by clicking below:

We also have maps and guides listed by area:

Cycle maps and cycle touring guide books by area and for England’s counties and the regions of Scotland

For example, we have maps covering the Midlands, South East England, Scotland, Wales etc, including the range of Sustrans pocket-size maps, OS Tour maps, Goldeneye maps, National Byway maps and where they are available, guide books showing suggested cycle routes.

For the English counties, we have those same maps and guides split out, eg for Devon, for Cumbria, for London etc, just as we do for the regions of Scotland, such as the Highlands and Islands, Edinburgh and the Borders etc.

Our new sections called ‘Cycling in …’, starting with Cycling in Devon, Cycling in the Lake District and Cumbria and Cycling in Sussex have information and suggestions on:

  • Suggested cycle touring and cycling holiday hubs
  • Gentle / family bike rides
  • Circular cycle tours
  • Guide books and maps for cycle touring
  • Waymarked long-distance cycle routes
  • Mountain biking / off-road cycle routes
  • Cycle-friendly holiday accommodation
  • Cycling maps and guide books

Quick links to the shop for cycle maps and guides by area or by county

International cycle guide books

We stock cycling guide books for various European destinations. Our French cycle route guide books are very popular, plus the cycle map of Mallorca, but there are quite a lot more. These cover the main areas:

Most popular cycle touring maps and guide books

Waymarked Coast to Coast Cycle Touring Routes in Britain

The C2C or Sea To Sea Sustrans coast to coast cycle route

The C2C map and guide books

The C2C is the iconic coast to coast cycle route. Normally done in 3-4 days, the C2C has some testing hills and beautiful scenery. The route is usually done West to East, with start points at Whitehaven and Workington, and end points at Tynemouth and Sunderland.

I have added some notes on route changes as a result of the floods in Cumbria in 2015 which destroyed the bridges between Keswick and Threlkeld.

C2C route changes in Cumbria after 2015 floods

We stock the official Sustrans C2C map, plus guide books from Cicerone and Excellent Books. Find out more by clicking the links above.

The Scottish C2C

The Scottish C2C cycle route is a brilliant new route across Southern Scotland. It starts on the Solway coast facing the Irish Sea, crosses the Southern Uplands, and finishes in Edinburgh on the Firth of Forth.

Hadrian’s Cycleway route

Hadrian’s Cycleway is a very popular coast-to-coast route. It starts in Tynemouth along the reverse of the C2C cycle route, but then keeps to the Tyne Valley to cross the Pennines. The route runs through Carlisle, then heads towards the fells of the Lake District, then heading towards the Cumbrian coast, where it finishes at Ravenglass.

Way of the Roses cycle route

The Way of the Roses is a newer waymarked cycle route, starting in the White Rose county of Yorkshire and finishing in the Red Rose county of Lancashire. It takes in York itself, the Yorkshire Dales and Lancaster.

The Devon Coast to Coast cycle route

You could also try the Devon Coast to Coast route. This is a great 2 or 3 day ride from the north coast of Devon to Plymouth via the edge of Dartmoor. It is almost all on disused railway lines and therefore mercifully car-free.

Other Waymarked Cycle Touring Routes in Britain

The Coast and Castles through Northumberland and the Scottish Borders is a glorious route. It hugs a beautiful coastline with lovely beaches and views of castles and islands. An alternative route climbs through the hills south of Edinburgh. The finish is in Edinburgh itself, not a bad place to finish a bike ride.

There are several excellent long-distance cycle routes in Scotland. The Lochs and Glens Sustrans route stretches from Carlisle all the way to Inverness. You can find these on the Sustrans maps for Scotland.

For example, the Coast and Castles North map from Sustrans leads from Edinburgh to Aberdeen, while other Sustrans Scottish cycle route maps include Forth & Clyde, and The Salmon Run.

The National Byway maps are waymarked routes linking Heritage sites in Yorkshire, the Midlands, Scotland and Northumberland.

I have some favourite long-distance cycle routes, so if you are looking for inspiration, you could read a blog post on my Top 5 Sustrans cycle routes.

Land’s End to John O’Groats cycle routes

And then there is LEJOG cycling from Land’s End to John O’Groats – or the other way around.

There is no defined single route, so there are now four different guide books showing options, some quick, some more leisurely journey.

The Sustrans pocket-sized maps would be an ideal way to work out your own options as well. You can buy them all here in one package. Sustrans now also have a guide book which shows the route entirely on the National Cycle Network.

Most popular cycle maps and guide books by area

Yorkshire cycle route maps and guide books

We have Sustrans maps, Goldeneye cycle maps and Harvey maps, covering the Yorkshire Dales, the North York Moors and the Yorkshire Wolds cycling routes. There is also the long-distance heritage cycle route in the National Byway map for Yorkshire.

Devon & Cornwall cycle routes

The author selflessly exploring South Devon

There are Ordnance Survey, Sustrans, Goldeneye and Harvey cycle maps for Cornwall and Devon. Long-distance bike routes include:

  • the Devon Coast to Coast guide book from Excellent Books
  • the Cornish Way and the Camel Trail on Sustrans maps
  • new South Coast West cycle route map from Sustrans

You can read more about cycle routes in Devon in the new blog post, Cycling in Devon.

Cycling in South and South East England

There is also stock here of Sustrans, Goldeneye, Vertebrate and CycleCity guide books and cycling maps for Kent, Sussex, Hampshire and the rest of south coast of England. The Sustrans South Coast East map carries the south coast cycle route all the way across to Kent.

Cumbria and the Lake District cycle maps and guide books

Cycling in Lakeland and the surrounding Cumbrian hills and coasts has become very popular.

There are good maps from Sustrans and Ordnance Survey, while you can read about a cycle tour of the area in ‘A Lake District Grand Tour. This is the separate website for the book A Lake District Grand Tour.

You can read suggestions for cycle routes in the area in our blog post Cycling in the Lake District and Cumbria.

Cycle routes in Northumberland and Durham

Cycle routes in Northumberland and Durham

Cycling in the North East of England can be a joy, and there are some great cycle routes, with very good maps and guide books to help.

The Sustrans pocket maps are very good, and the waymarked C2C, Reivers, Hadrian’s and Coast & Castles all have a start or end-point here with accompanying maps, while the waymarked National Byway route is a way to explore the area’s heritage on your bike.

Most popular cycle maps and guide books for Europe

France cycle-touring guide books

We have the very, very good cycle-touring guide books from Excellent Books: Cycling Southern France, Cycling Northern France, the Veloscenic (from Paris to Versailles and on to Mont St Michel) and Avenue Verte (the London to Paris cycle route).

We have guide books to cycling in France from Cicerone Books, including Cycling the River Loire and Canal du Midi routes.

There are also detailed cycle guides to Brittany and Normandy: Brittany’s Green Ways and the V4.

France En Velo is a guide to cycling end to end in France, with loads of great pictures and maps.

Cycling travel books 

Our cycling travel books include the books of Alastair Humphreys and Anne Mustoe.

Cycling humour books

With many of the funny cycle travel books now out of print unfortunately, you could try The Full English and A Lake District Grand Tour .

Practical cycle guide books

The practical cycle books on the website include the excellent Electric Bikes, Brompton Bikes, City Cycling, Family Cycling and more.

Mountain biking guide books 

We have a range of mountain-bike guide books and maps from Vertebrate and Goldeneye covering major mountain-bike areas around Britain, such as the Peak District, the South Downs, the Cotswolds etc.

The map and guide book publishers

Sustrans maps
Just part of the extensive Sustrans map range

The maps and books we stock are from a wide range of publishers who specialise in cycling. So if you are searching for a particular range, this listing could help. The following are just the most popular:

  • Sustrans cycle maps, including the pocket-sized range covering the whole of the UK and Northern Ireland, and waymarked National Cycle Network touring routes, including the C2C, Devon Coast to Coast, the South Coast cycle route, Coast & Castles etc.
  • Ordnance Survey tour maps, covering popular holiday areas of the UK – the Peak District, the Lake District, Devon, Cornwall, Scotland and the Cotswolds.
  • Cicerone cycle guide books, with guides including France, Spain, the Danube, End to End (LEJOG), and the C2C
  • Goldeneye Cycle Maps: Two series of maps. The country lanes series including Devon, Cornwall, the Cotswolds, Sussex, Kent, Norfolk and Suffolk. The off-road mountain-bike routes series, including Dartmoor, Exmoor, the Cotswolds and the Lake District.
  • Guide books by Excellent Books – C2C, France, Trans-Pennine Trail, Devon Coast to Coast, Electric Bikes, Brompton Bikes and more.
  • National Byway maps, with heritage cycle routes for the Midlands, Yorkshire, the North East of England and South West Scotland.
  • Harvey cycle maps of Yorkshire and Dartmoor.
  • The Cyclecity and Vertebrate guide book ranges, including Sussex, Kent, Hampshire and the Lake District.
  • Red Dog Books, specialising in guide books of Brittany and Normandy.
  • And humorous travel bike books from Bike Ride Books (spoiler alert – this is me).

Blog posts

Cycling blog posts

Payment

We use Sagepay to securely process payments and can therefore accept online payments via Visa, MasterCard and other main debit and credit cards.

We don’t take card details and payment over the phone, only via the webshop.

Here are handy links for you to go direct to the shop.

Quick links to the Bike Ride Maps webshop

And:

AND FINALLY!

Finally: we hope you have seen that there are a lot of cycle maps and cycle touring guide books to choose from on the website here.

We’ll be happy send out your map or book.

Cycle Maps and Cycle Touring Guide Books

North York Moors, Tees Valley and Durham Coast Sustrans cycle map

North York Moors, Tees Valley & Durham Coast Cycle Map

North York Moors, Tees Valley and Durham Coast Sustrans cycle map 33

 

North York Moors, Tees Valley & Durham Coast Cycle Map
North York Moors, Tees Valley & Durham Coast Cycle Map

This area map in the Sustrans series shows the National Cycle Network and local routes in this area. It covers the North York Moors, the Cinder Track, the eastern part of the Walney to Wear Cycle Route and five individual day rides.

This pocket-sized colour map shows clearly mapped on-road and traffic-free paths, easy to read contours, and detailed inset maps for the major towns and cities as well as recommended linking routes connecting the NCN with quiet roads. The map also features 5 day rides with directions and a description of the area, highlighting key cycle routes, local history and places of interest.

Major routes covered on North York Moors, Tees Valley and Durham Coast Sustrans cycle map 33:

* National Route 1 (North Sea Cycle Route) between Scarborough and Seaham.

* National Route 65 between Sutton-Under-Whitestonecliffe and Middlesborough.

* National Route 165 from Barnard Castle to Whitby. This is the Walney to Whitby cycle route. This map and the Walney to Wear Cycle Map cover the whole Walney to Whitby coast to coast cycle route.

* National Route 14 from Darlington to Durham via Middlesborough and Hartlepool.

North York Moors, Tees Valley and Durham Coast Sustrans cycle map 33

Page Size: 99 x 155 mm
ISBN 10: 1910845531
ISBN 13: 9781910845530
Publisher: Sustrans
Published Date: May 2018
Edition: 2nd ed, May 2018
Binding: Sheet map (folded)
Weight: 50g

UK cycle maps and guide books by area

UK cycle maps and guide books

UK CYCLE MAPS AND GUIDE BOOKS BY AREA, REGION OR NATION

Click a link below for UK cycle maps and guide books.

Dartmoor and South Devon Goldeneye map - the southern half

South West England cycle maps and guide books

Ordnance Survey, Sustrans, Goldeneye and Harvey cycle maps for Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire, Bristol and Gloucestershire

Long-distance cycle routes include the Devon Coast to Coast guide book from Excellent Books and the Sustrans map.

The Sustrans South Coast West map starts in Devon, heading east as far as Dover.

For more information on Devon, read the Cycling in Devon blog.

South Coast and South East of England cycle maps and guide books

Surrey and West Sussex Cycle Tours sample pages

Sustrans, Goldeneye, Vertebrate and CycleCity cycling guide books and maps for Hampshire, the Isle of Wight, Sussex, Surrey and Kent.

Sustrans pocket-size maps for every county in the region.

Long-distance routes include the South Downs Way, with a Vertebrate guide book.

For more information on Sussex, read the Cycling in Sussex blog.

London, Thames Valley and Chilterns cycle maps and guide books

Sustrans, CycleCity cycle maps and guide books for London, Oxford, the Thames Valley, Hertfordshire, Essex, and the Chilterns .

The Cotswolds cycle maps and guide books

Goldeneye Maps, Ordnance Survey and Sustrans cycle maps for the Cotswolds and Gloucestershire.

Cicerone guide book for the Cotswolds.

Long-distance routes include the National Byway Midlands route from Gloucestershire to Chester.

Midlands and Welsh Marches cycle maps and guide books

Sustrans maps for Shropshire, Herefordshire, Staffordshire, plus CycleCity’s guide to the Midlands and the Peak District.

National Byway’s long-distance cycle route for the Midlands.

South Pennines and Peak District Off-road Cycle Map

Peak District and Pennines cycle maps and guide books

Wide range of cycle maps from Sustrans, Ordnance Survey, Excellent Books.

Plus off-road and mountain-bike maps and guide books.

Eastern England, including East Anglia cycle maps and guide books

Sustrans and Goldeneye cycle maps for Suffolk and Norfolk.

CycleCity guide to the Chilterns, Hertfordshire and Essex.

Sustrans maps also for Lincolnshire, the Fens and Essex.

Yorkshire cycle maps and guide books

Cycling in the Yorkshire Dales sample pages

Good range of cycling maps from Sustrans, Goldeneye and Harvey, covering the Yorkshire Dales, the North York Moors and the Yorkshire Wolds.

Long-distance routes include National Byway for Yorkshire.

North West England cycle maps and guide books

Sustrans maps for Cheshire, Merseyside, Greater Manchester and Lancashire.

Cycle guide book for Lancashire (Cicerone).

Long-distance routes include National Byway for the Midlands, which runs north to Chester.

North East England cycle maps and guide books

The Northumberland cycle map is produced locally by the north east riders and is a brilliant resource.

Sustrans have pocket-sized maps for Northumberland and County Durham of course.

Long-distance routes include National Byway for the North East, plus the C2C, Reivers, Walney to Wear and Hadrian’s Cycleway.

Lake District and Cumbria cycle maps and guide books

Lake District Mountain Biking, from Vertebrate Publishing

CycleCity and Vertebrate have very good guides to cycle routes around Cumbria.

Ordnance Survey have a Tour map of Cumbria showing cycle routes, while Sustrans have a Lake District and South Cumbria map and a North Cumbria map, both in their Pocket Maps range.

‘The Lake District Grand Tour’ is a funny tale of cycling the passes and the perimeter of the Lake District.

Long-distance routes include the C2C, Reivers, Walney to Wear and Hadrian’s Cycleway.

For more information, read the blog post Cycling in Cumbria and the Lake District.

Ordnance Survey - Scotland detail

Scotland cycle maps and guide books

A fabulous range of Sustrans route maps and excellent guide to the Isles and Highlands (by Phil Horsley).

Long-distance routes include the Scottish C2C, Lochs and Glens, Coast and Castles North, the Salmon Run, and Aberdeen to Orkney and Shetland.

Wales cycle maps and guide books

Ordnance Survey Tour maps and Sustrans maps for North and Mid Wales and for South and Mid Wales.

Long-distance route maps and guide books for the Celtic Trail, Lon Las Cymru, Lon Cambria and Lon Teifi.

Northern Ireland cycle maps

Sustrans maps for Northern Ireland including, Belfast, the Causeway Coast, Derry-Londonderry and Fermanagh.

Maps for each of England’s counties, the regions of Scotland, and Wales and Northern Ireland

UK cycle maps and guide books by area

Click here for a full list at the Bike Ride Maps shop:

UK cycle maps and guide books

Long-distance cycle-touring routes in the UK

We stock a wide range of maps and guide books for all of the long-distance cycle-touring routes in the UK. What’s more, we have cycled a good few of them or at least parts of them!

These include the C2C coast to coast cycle route, the Scottish C2C, the Reivers Route, Hadrian’s Cycleway, Walney to Wear, the Way of the Roses, the Trans-Pennine Trail, the Devon Coast to Coast, the Coast and Castles and Land’s End to John O’Groats.

The waymarked cycle routes are mostly Sustrans official routes, though some are not: the Reivers Route is a regional route and LEJOG has no official route or signposting at all. Click the links below to find more information on each, or to buy cycle maps / guide books, click to go direct to the Shop.

Long-distance cycle-touring routes in the UK

Long-distance cycle-touring routes in the UK

The C2C Coast to Coast Cycle Route – the ‘Sea to Sea’

The C2C Coast to Coast Cycle Route - the 'Sea to Sea'
The C2C Coast to Coast Cycle Route – the ‘Sea to Sea’

This is the iconic coast to coast cycle route, normally done in 3-4 days. Some testing hills and beautiful scenery.

The route is normally done West to East, with start points at Whitehaven and Workington, and end points at Tynemouth and Sunderland.

More information on the Sustrans C2C coast to coast cycle route.

Buy the Sustrans C2C coast to coast cycle route map and a guide book.

The Scottish C2C Coast to Coast cycle route

This is a new cycle route through the Southern Uplands of Scotland, from coast to coast. This is the complete guide to the Scottish C2C. The guide book includes maps, directions, attractions along the way, accommodation and much more.

More information on the Scottish C2C cycle route.

Buy the Scottish C2C cycle route guide book.

Hadrian’s Cycleway

Probably the second most popular coast-to-coast route.

Starts in Tynemouth along the same route as the C2C, but then keeps to the Tyne Valley to cross the Pennines.

More information on Hadrian’s Cycleway.

Buy the Sustrans Hadrian’s Cycleway map.

The Reivers Route

Reivers Route cycle map

Originally known as “The Return C2C”, the Reivers Route starts at Tynemouth and finishes in Whitehaven. It’s wilder country than the C2C, and a longer route, but with fewer big climbs.

More information on the Reivers Route.

Buy the Reivers Route cycle map.

Walney to Wear Cycle Route

Probably the least cycled of the routes linking the Cumbrian coast and the North East, but an extremely good route.

More information on the Walney to Wear cycle route.

Buy the Sustrans Walney to Wear cycle route map.

Way of the Roses Cycle Route

Starting on the Lancashire coast, and finishing on the Yorkshire coast, taking in Lancaster, the Dales and York along the way.

174 miles. A cracking route.

More information on the Way of the Roses cycle route.

Buy the Sustrans Way of the Roses cycle route map and guide book.

Trans-Pennine Trail

Starting on the Lancashire coast at Southport, heading into Liverpool on marked cycleways, then east into Manchester and on into Yorkshire.

More information on the Trans-Pennine Trail.

Buy the Trans-Pennine Trail maps and guide books.

Devon Coast to Coast Cycle Route

Devon Coast to Coast cycle route
Devon Coast to Coast cycle route

This is a 102 mile route from either Ilfracombe or Bude on the north coast of Devon to Plymouth on the south coast. It is a wonderful route taking in coasts, estuaries and beaches, plus The Granite Way on the flank of Dartmoor, the Plym Valley Trail and the famous Tarka Trail.

Easier than the real C2C, but still with some climbs – it’s not flat! If you’re not sure about the real C2C as a challenge, maybe do this one first?

More information on the Devon Coast to Coast cycle route.

Buy your Devon Coast to Coast cycle route maps and guide book.

Coast and Castles Cycle Route

The 200 mile Coast & Castles South cycle route (National Route 1) links the Forth and Tyne estuaries, taking in some of Britain’s best built and natural heritage, including Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site, unspoiled coastline and the beautiful Tweed Valley before arriving in Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city.

An extension to Aberdeen is now Coast and Castles North.

More information on the Coast and Castles cycle route.

Buy your Coast & Castles map here.

And then there is the granddaddy of long-distance cycle-touring routes in the UK – 

Land’s End to John O’Groats Cycle Route

End to End Cycle Route – Land’s End to John O’Groats, by Nick Mitchell, Cicerone

Three guide books show a variety of routes, from country lanes to fast A-roads. The guide books are:

– Phil Horsley’s ‘Land’s End to John O’Groats – Great British Cycling Adventure’.

– Brian Smailes’s ‘Land’s End to John O’Groats Guide’.

– Cicerone’s ‘End to End Cycle Route – Land’s End to John O’Groats’.

More information on the Land’s End to John O’Groats cycling guide books.

Buy your Land’s End to John O’Groats cycle guide book

Other long-distance cycle-touring routes in the UK

There are other waymarked cycle-touring routes of course, and you can find them in the Shop here.